Thanksgiving for 10 Averages $50: Help Owners Prep

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The average cost to host a 10-guest Thanksgiving spread is $49.48, according to a 2012 American Farm Bureau Federation survey of 150 volunteer shoppers around the country.

The cost of preparing your home for holiday guests is much more difficult to determine. But you can help owners do it wisely and efficiently. Add to your e-newsletter a free article, Tips on How to Prepare Your Home for Holiday Guests, from the REALTOR® Content Resource. It’s one of five free articles now available in the November “Be the Host with the Most for Thanksgiving” article package. Share all five today.

Visit houselogic.com for more articles like this.

Copyright 2014 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

REALTOR® Content Resource is brought to you by the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®. With it, you can download free homeownership content from HouseLogic to your marketing materials.

Source - Realtor.org

Scientifically Develop the Habit of Lead Generation: Part 1

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Alex Cavelli

By Alex Cavelli

“First you make your habits, then your habits make you.”
Lucas Remmerswaal

We all have good intentions. Early in my career, I set a lofty goal. My intention was to prospect Monday through Friday and speak with 25 people each day about their lives and real estate.

For about six months, Monday and Tuesday were strong days for me.  I was feeling productive.  Best of all, I was setting appointments and winning listings at a rate I was happy with.

But by the time Wednesday or Thursday hit, I lost my motivation. I went from making 25 contacts on Monday and Tuesday, to 15 on Wednesday, to maybe 10 on Thursday. By Friday I was down to zero. Not only did fail to measure up, I also started questioning my commitment and abilities—not good for the psyche.

What happened? Regardless of my skill level, there had to be an explanation of why it was so challenging to finish a full week of lead generation. So, I spoke with willpower scientist Colin Robertson. Robertson runs a company called Willpowered and has devoted his life to scientifically determine what it takes to win our mental battles.

After explaining my situation to Robertson, our conversation went like this:

Robertson: Would you expect to run 25 miles your first time out?
Me: Of course not.
Robertson: Why?
Me: That’s not realistic. I can’t finish that without training.
Robertson: So then what would you do?
Me: I would start at maybe three miles and build up from there.
Robertson: Why three?
Me: Because three miles is challenging, but I know I can finish.
Robertson: Alex, have you ever talked to 25 people for five straight days about real estate?

See? Makes sense. Robertson says that, as humans, we tend to be overly optimistic about our abilities when attempting to develop a new “keystone habit”. It’s sort of like the New Year’s resolution effect. We get super excited early on but soon our willpower fades and we are back to square one.

Starting at 125 contacts per week, at least for me, was like running a marathon on day one. I was setting myself up for failure. Instead, we had two choices: We can start with that New Year’s resolution type of goal that ultimately fizzles out, or we can approach the problem scientifically.

“Do Not Fail.” Robertson’s very simple and manageable “Do Not Fail” philosophy is the starting point to creating great habits. We tend to approach goals like I did – wanting big results right away. But when trying to create a habit, consistency is what we should be aiming for. Here’s how Robertson helped me determine the right goal for me:

Robertson: How many people can you talk to consistently each day that guarantees you will finish?
Me: I can probably make 15 contacts on a consistent basis.
Robertson: “Probably” won’t work. What is the number that guarantees that you will not fail?
Me: I see. That number is definitely ten.
Robertson: For the next four weeks, talk with ten people each day. No more, no less.

Here’s the science. In making ten contacts/day, there are no days where I don’t make any progress. Every day my client list is growing no matter what. And with every day that I make ten contacts, confidence grows that I’ll be able to make ten contacts the next day (and the next day) as well. When I’m ready, I can increase that number to 15 or 20 – just like a runner would gradually increase his or her mileage when training for a marathon.

The end, for now. Our career is not comprised of one sprint. It’s rather about running with a steady, consistent pace and then increasing that pace over time. If you want to run a marathon, then start with a 5k and pace yourself. In other words, to start the habit of lead generation, set aside one hour each day to make anywhere from 5-10 contacts with your sphere, past clients, FSBOs, or expireds. The point is to be consistent and start with a goal that guarantees you will finish.

Next week we’ll connect with Mr. Willpowered again to discuss the next step to scientifically develop the habit of prospecting: “The Seinfeld Method.”

In the meantime, if you’re curious about my progress and would like to discuss a lead generation plan that works for you, please contact me. I can be your first contact of many.

Alex Cavelli is a REALTOR® with Keller Williams Greater Cleveland Northeast. Connect with Alex via linkedin.com/in/cavelli or Alexcavelli@kw.com.

Source - Realtor.org

Be Professional to Be Successful

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By Brandon Johnson

There’s a real trick to appearing, communicating, and performing like an experienced real estate professional. And, as a 23-year-old agent who got his real estate license in June of this year, I want to share how I transformed myself in less than half a year on the job.

Only 3 percent of licensees are under the age of thirty in my local association, and I am the second youngest overall. Still, I can proudly say I have started off strong as the youngest agent in our brokerage to make the top producer’s list my third month as a licensee. The key to my early success is that I quickly adjusted to the demands of being a real estate pro in three key areas.

Looking Like a Professional. I look young. When people initially meet me, many are inclined to think I’ve just graduated from high school. Therefore, the hardest part of working an open house the first few times was not answering questions about taxes or square footage. I realized that customers came in assuming that I am not an expert, a professional, or in some cases not even a real estate agent. I needed to change that, so I started to experiment with my attire. When I started to wear a shirt, tie, blazer, and slacks, clients started to ask real estate questions and not questions asked about how much experience I had. I realized I had to change my appearance to stand out compared to other agents. If a customer attended a dozen open houses on a Sunday I wanted to be the agent that stood out so that when I followed up they would remember me. As a result, my open house activity directly contributed to thirty percent of my closings.

Speaking Like a Professional. Of course, a clothing change isn’t going to stop everyone from asking about my boyish looks. But when clients did ask, I realized I could simply state that I am working in my first year under our company’s mentor program and get back to the real estate questions. But when a customer seriously questions your age as a negative factor of being a real estate agent, you cannot let them leave your presence without proving that your age is actually an asset. I tell clients that since I am younger I have fewer commitments, allowing me to spend more time focusing on my career. When you explain that you have devoted your life to a new career and that you are passionate about working in real estate, people will understand that you truly want to work for them. When I tell them of my early successes, I am not boasting. I am telling them that I am qualified to represent them as a real estate expert. The best advice I received about communicating like a professional was not to rush into answers to sound like you know it all. If a customer asks a question that you cannot answer with certainty, tell them. I respond by saying they asked a good question and I would like to ask the listing agent or my manager to provide the most accurate answer in a timely manner. If I’m at an open house I tell them that I will respond to them Monday afternoon and ask for their contact information. Because I was honest, I usually am able to turn that short interaction into a lead.

Goal Planning Like a Professional. I told our managing broker that I wanted to close a million dollars’ worth of deals before the end of the year. Her response was not negative, but it was not optimistic either. I entered into real estate clueless of what an average first-year agent produces. I wanted to be a top producer, and that led to me working like a top producer. I noticed that the most experienced agents in our office started working around 8:30 in the morning. I made it a goal to beat them into the office every morning. I noticed that many agents work an open house every Sunday but the best agents work two, so that’s what I do. I can honestly say the amount of time I spend in the office is the reason that I have generated most of my leads. Lead generation aside, my time spent in the office impresses the more experienced agents I work with. I tell my clients that I have 100 years of experience because of the network I have built in our office with my fellow real estate agents. I tell them that my company will not let me fail, and that my goal is to build a relationship with them that will be converted into a closing.

Brandon Johnson was born and raised in Rockford, Illinois. He graduated from Keith Country Day School in 2009, graduated from the University of Illinois in 2013. During his time there studied Spanish linguistics and international relations, became a member of Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity, and expanded his family’s business. He became a licensed broker in June 2014. Brandon is a council member of Rockford Illinois’ Young Professional Network. Also, at the age of 23 he is one of the youngest licensees in the Rockford Association. Outside of real estate Brandon is a certified IHSA Basketball official and enjoys being involved with the community.

Source - Realtor.org

3 Staging Solutions to Modernize a Space

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By Melissa Dittmann Tracey, REALTOR(R) Magazine

Stager Sandra Holmes, president of Home Staging Concepts in South Florida, shows how a few design touches can instantly transform a room.

#1 Accessorize it.

Master suite sitting area

Problem: The nearly bare seating area wasn’t sending the message of luxury in this multi-million dollar home.

BEFORE

 

Solution: Holmes wanted to soften the look and create a more intimate seating area. She brought in tables, added accessories and greenery and faux fur pillows for a layered look, and anchored the space with a textured rug.

AFTER
Photo credit: Sandra Holmes, Home Staging Concepts, www.homestagingconcepts.net

 

#2 Furnish it.

Great room

Problem: This large great room was vacant, devoid of any personality, and buyers were having difficulty envisioning the layout for furniture.

BEFORE

Solution: Holmes offered up a picture by giving a modern treatment to the space, using furniture with straight lines, mismatching – but complementary—patterns and textures through fabrics and artwork, glass table-lamps, and color pops of blues.

AFTER
Photo credit: Sandra Holmes, Home Staging Concepts, www.homestagingconcepts.net

 

#3 Re-imagine it.

Guest bedroom

Problem: This condo bedroom showed it was great for children, but the owners of this beachfront home were missing an opportunity to show the space off as the perfect guest room.

BEFORE

Solution: Holmes transformed the room to a guest bedroom, adding light, soft colors through new bedding and accented it with beach-themed artwork over the twin beds.

AFTER
Photo credit: Sandra Holmes, Home Staging Concepts, www.homestagingconcepts.net

 

 

Source - Realtor.org

Share These Fall Garden Cleanup Tips with Your Home Owners

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Help home owners show off their garden even when it’s not in full bloom. E-mail the handy article “How to Clean Up Your Garden for Fall and Winter“ from the REALTOR® Content Resource. It’s one of five free articles now available in the “Maintenance to Do Now“ article package that you can e-mail or share on any of your social media today.

Visit houselogic.com for more articles like this.

Copyright 2014 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

REALTOR® Content Resource is brought to you by the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®. With it, you can download free homeownership content from HouseLogic to your marketing materials.

Source - Realtor.org